Connolly & Hickey 

Squan Beach Life Saving Station #9
Manasquan, New Jersey
Client: Borough of Manasquan
Grant: Garden State Historic Preservation Trust Fund

Squan Beach Life Saving Station #9

Squan Beach Life Saving Station #9 Squan Beach Life Saving Station #9 Squan Beach Life Saving Station #9 Squan Beach Life Saving Station #9
Squan Beach Life Saving Station #9 Squan Beach Life Saving Station #9 Squan Beach Life Saving Station #9 Squan Beach Life Saving Station #9
Squan Beach Life Saving Station #9 Squan Beach Life Saving Station #9    
(click on image for larger view)
Brief Historical Overview:
The Squan Beach Life Saving Station is one of approximately forty-two life-saving stations that were situated three and a half miles apart between Sandy Hook and Cape May in the early-twentieth century. The Station was constructed in 1903 in the popular style for stations from this area, the Duluth-style. Squan Beach Station is historically significant for its association with the United States Life-Saving Service. The construction of the Station in 1903, superseding an older and smaller station in the same location, coincides with the continual expansion of the Life-Saving Service throughout the late-nineteenth and early-twentieth centuries. The Life-Saving Service remained a viable government organization until 1915 when it was combined with the Revenue Marine Service to create the United States Coast Guard. The Squan Beach Life-Saving Station served as a life-saving station until 1936 when a new station was constructed at Point Pleasant Beach.
The Station is architecturally significant as a fine example of a Duluth-type Life-Saving Station constructed based on a design prepared by architect, George R. Tolman, in 1893. The Station utilized the architectural features popular in the late-nineteenth and early-twentieth centuries, specifically the Shingle Style with Colonial Revival elements. The plan of the facility was typical for life-saving stations during the period providing three basic components: the boatroom, the tower and the living quarters.

Scope of Services:
Connolly & Hickey prepared a Historic Preservation Plan for the Station in 2006. The Historic Preservation Plan summarizes the results of a survey-level assessment of the exterior and interior conditions of the Station, identifies significant features, and proposes appropriate uses for the station to serve as a museum, community center and limited Borough offices. The report makes recommendations for restoration and rehabilitation of the building in two phases, and includes estimates of probable cost. The firm prepared the nomination for the station for placement on the New Jersey and National Registers of Historic Places. The Phase I Interior Restoration and Rehabilitation of the Station is planned for completion in 2010 and includes restoration of the front and rear porches, making upgrades for barrier-free compliance, restoration of the first floor spaces including new restroom and kitchenette facilities, and installation of new mechanical and electrical systems to support use of the building for various functions. Connolly & Hickey is assisting the Borough in administration of the contract for construction.

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Connolly & Hickey  l   P.O. Box 1726  l   Cranford, New Jersey 07016  l   info@chhistoricalarchitects.com  l   973-746-4911   facebook